Tim Hall

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Oracle related rants (and lots of off-topic stuff)...
Updated: 3 months 3 weeks ago

Video : Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS) : AutoREST

Mon, 2019-10-07 02:05

Today’s video is a demonstration of the AutoREST feature of Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS).

This is based on the following article.

I also have a bunch of other articles here.

The star of today’s video is Connor McDonald of “600 slides in 45 minutes” fame, and more recently AskTom

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS) : AutoREST was first posted on October 7, 2019 at 8:05 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

MOS Auto Responses : What’s my problem with them?

Wed, 2019-10-02 02:54

A couple of days ago I took to Twitter with a rather “incendiary” tweet caused by my frustration with MOS. It’s not about the specific SR or issue itself. It’s more a frustration with MOS generally and the way they handle some requests, specifically the automatic responses. I’ll explain.

The Moaning
  • I had an issue.
  • I Googled and didn’t find too much in the way of help.
  • I opened a SR about the issue, including an image to help explain my issue.
  • During that process it suggested some other stuff I might want to look at, one of which was quite interesting, but none of which were actually relevant. No problems I thought. At least I’ve learned something…
  • Next thing I get some emails about updates to my call. I logged in to find these 4 responses.
Response 1 Response 2 Response 3 Response 4
  • I was really angry about the auto-responses, and unloaded on Twitter using some rather “choice language”…

I totally understand a request for more information. The response of, “Please upload the RDA/TFA/AHF file”, is common and understandable on many occasions. It does annoy me more than a little when you are asking a general question, that is not specific to your software version, but you still have to upload it. Whatever…

So why did I lose the plot this time?

  • There are 4 messages, instead of one consolidated message. I hate that. It’s annoying. I just know that someone is running a report saying, “Look, we’ve done 1 gazillion responses this month”, but it’s all generated crap! This should have been one concise and clear request for additional information.
  • Just look at that second response. Are you kidding me? Loads of rubbish I don’t need to know and repetition of the first message. If I sent this sort of message to my users I’d be marched out of the building. If you think this is acceptable, please quit your job now! You have no place in a role that is even remotely user-facing.
  • How do you think people are going to respond to this? It makes me angry and I kind-of know what I’m doing. How do you expect some junior member of staff to respond to this? I’ll tell you how. They will ignore it, never fix the issue and think “Oracle is crap”. Thanks! Just what we need. I asked a colleague to look at it and their response was, “It’s like they don’t want you to continue with the request”. See?
  • People pay a lot of money for support, and this is what you are presented with? Really?

I’ve now deleted the tweet. I was *not* asked to delete it, and if I had been I definitely would not have, but I decided to because it was gathering too much momentum, such is the general feeling about Oracle Support, and it was not meant to be me grandstanding. It was just genuine frustration with a service my company is paying money for!

I’m a fan of automation. I understand wanting to streamline the SR process, and if automation can help, that’s great, but this is not the way to do it!

What should it look like?

It’s just my opinion, but I think something like this would be reasonable.

We need more information to continue. Please run the following Trace File Analyzer (TFA) commands and upload the files.

1) Run this command on the Agent target machine and answer the questions when prompted.

./tfactl diagcollect -srdc emtbsmetric

2) Enable debug on the OMS server using this command.

./tfactl diagcollect -srdc emdebugon

Repeat the actions in EM that you are trying to diagnose, then disable debug on the OMS server using this command.

./tfactl diagcollect -srdc emdebugoff

If you need more information about TFA or manual file collection for this issue, check out DOC ID 2279135.1.

If you would like to read more about the My Oracle Support automatic troubleshooting, check out Doc ID 1929376.1.

A single message that asks for the relevant information, and gives links if you need something more. That gets the job done, isn’t scary to new people and isn’t going to cause me to lose it on Twitter.

Feedback from Oracle

You may have noticed this post in my feed for a couple of days, but when you clicked on it, it was password protected. That’s because I wrote the post to provide some better feedback than my initial tweet, but delayed the publication while I waited for some feedback from Oracle. I was put in contact with the Vice President, Global Customer Support and the Sr. Director, DB-EM Proactive Support. Their respective responses were as follows. I’ve left out their names as not all folks like being name-checked.

“Hi Tim, Just reviewed your blog post and agree that the auto-responses are verbose. Adding our DB proactive lead who will follow up with you directly on planned next steps.”

Vice President, Global Customer Support

“Hi Tim, I have reviewed your blog regarding your experiences with SR automation. I want to thank you for providing this feedback. Direct feedback from users of SR automation is extremely important and valuable. We take the effectiveness of our SR automation very seriously. Our intention is to provide a streamlined support experience which allows us to identify information, up front in the SR, that will result in the shortest resolution time. There is a balance between casting a wide net to ensure we receive all diagnostic data required vs. the ease of consuming/executing the request to get that data. Admittedly, we don’t always strike the correct balance.   

Regarding the case described in your blog, I agree that our diagnostic messaging should be more concise and consumable. I also appreciate your thoughts on using collectors, such as TFA, to simplify the instructions. We have a plan to address this specific automation flow to eliminate superfluous information and provide a clear message around what is required and how to obtain that information. Additionally, I will incorporate your feedback into our review process, which is conducted on an on-going basis for our automation flows. Please feel free to contact me if you have any other feedback or suggestions. As I said, this kind of feedback is appreciated and always welcomed.”

Sr. Director, DB-EM Proactive Support

The whole Twitter episode wasn’t my finest moment, but if nothing else I’m glad the message got through to the correct people. Of course, all of this is just words unless something substantial happens. Please don’t let us down!

To everyone else out there, please continue to add your own constructive feedback on all things (in life). There’s no point complaining about a problem, if you’ve never actually raised it. I think of it like voting. If you didn’t bother to vote, I don’t really think you are entitled to moan about the outcome.

Cheers

Tim…

PS. Comments are disabled.

MOS Auto Responses : What’s my problem with them? was first posted on October 2, 2019 at 8:54 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

MobaXterm 12.2

Wed, 2019-09-25 02:06

In another “the rest of the world ceases to exist in the lead up to OpenWorld” moment, I missed the release of MobaxTerm 12.2.

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

For Windows users who, like me, spend most of the day connecting to machines via SSH, this is the best tool I’ve found.

Cheers

Tim…

MobaXterm 12.2 was first posted on September 25, 2019 at 8:06 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

OpenWorld and Code One 2019 : The Journey Home

Fri, 2019-09-20 09:06

I got up at a reasonable time and got caught up with blog posts, then it was time to check out and get the BART to the airport. Bag drop was empty, because the rest of the planet was waiting at security. After what felt like an eternity I was through security and sat down and waited for my plane…

We boarded the flight from San Francisco to Amsterdam on time and didn’t have a significant wait for the departure slot, so the captain said we would arrive early. No luck with a spare seat on this flight. The guy next to me was about my size, but wasn’t making an effort to stay in his space. There was some serious man-spreading going on. I ended up spending most of the flight leaning into the aisle and pulling my arm across my body, so my left elbow feels knackered now. Doing that for 11 hours is not fun. I managed to watch the following films.

  • The Shape of Water – I love this film. I’ve seen it a load of times.
  • Rocketman – I wasn’t feeling this at the start. I’m not big on musicals, and I didn’t like the stuff when he was a kid. Once Taron Egerton started playing him it was cool. I kind-of forgot he wasn’t Elton John. If you can get past the start, it’s worth a go!
  • The Accountant – I liked it. Ben Affleck doing deadpan and expressionless is the perfect role for him.
  • John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum – I got up to the final sequence, so I’m not sure how it ends. Pretty much the same as the previous films, which I liked. Just crazy fight scenes with loads of guns.

There was one bit of the flight that was odd. The in-flight entertainment died, then we hit some turbulence. Queue me deciding it was linked and we were all going to die… Pretty soon the turbulence stopped, then after about 10 minutes the screens rebooted…

I had quite a long wait at Schiphol. About 3 hours. That was pretty dull, but what are you going to do?

The flight from Amsterdam to Birmingham was delayed by a few minutes, then the was the issue of people trying to board with 15 pieces of hand luggage and a donkey. I had my bag on my feet. Luckily it was only an hour flight.

II was originally planning to get the train home, but I was so tired I got a taxi. The driver was a nice guy and we had a chat about his kids and future plans, which is a lot nicer than listening to me drone on…

I’m now home and started doing the washing…

I’ll do a wrap-up post tomorrow, with some thoughts about the event…

Cheers

Tim…

OpenWorld and Code One 2019 : The Journey Home was first posted on September 20, 2019 at 3:06 pm.
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VirtualBox 6.0.12

Tue, 2019-09-17 11:35

I know I’ve been distracted with the lead up to OpenWorld and Code One 2019, but how did I miss this release? VirtualBox 6.0.12 arrived two weeks ago.

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

Being a reckless type, I downloaded it and installed it on my Windows 10m laptop this morning. I’ve got a live demo in 2 hours!

The install was fine and my Vagrant VMs start with no problems. More extensive testing and installations on Oracle Linux and macOS hosts will happen when I get home, but so far so good!

Cheers

Tim…

VirtualBox 6.0.12 was first posted on September 17, 2019 at 5:35 pm.
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Oracle OpenWorld and Code One 2019

Fri, 2019-09-06 02:40

It’s nearly time for the madness to start again. This will be my 14th trip to San Francisco for OpenWorld, and however many it is since Java One and Code One got wrapped up into this…

  • Flights booked : ✔
  • Hotel booked : ✔
  • ESTA approved : ✔
  • Irrational fear of flying and general anxiety : ✔
  • 80 lbs weight loss : ❌
  • Talk complete : ❌
  • Denial : ✔

At the moment the scheduled stuff looks like this.

Friday :

  • 03:00 UK time : Start the trip over to SF. I know I said I would never do this again, and I know what the consequences will be…
  • Evening SF time : Groundbreaker Ambassador Dinner

Saturday : Day : ACE Director Briefing

Sunday :

  • Day : Groundbreaker Ambassador Briefing
  • Evening : Oracle ACE Dinner

Tuesday :

Session ID: DEV1314
The Seven Deadly Sins of SQL
Date: 17th Sept 2019
Time: 11:30 – 12:15

Wednesday :

Session ID: DEV6013
Embracing Constant Technical Innovation in Our Daily Life
Date: 18th Sept 2019
Time: 16:00 – 16:45
Panel: Gustavo Gonzalez, Sven Bernhardt, Debra Lilley, Francisco Munoz Alvarez, Me

Thursday : Fly home.

Friday : Arrive home, have a post-conference breakdown and promise myself I’ll never do it again…

In addition to those I have to schedule in the following:

  • A shift on the Groundbreakers Hub, but I’m not sure what day or what demo yet. I’ll probably hang around there a lot anyway.
  • Meet a photographer to get some photos done. I’ve told them they’ve got to be tasteful and “only above the waist”.
  • Spend some time annoying everyone on the demo grounds. I know Kris and Jeff are desperate to see me. It’s the highlight of their year!
  • Stalk Wim Coekaerts, whilst maintaining an air of ambivalence, so as not to give the game away. Can anyone else hear Bette Midler singing “Wind Beneath My Wings”? No? Just me?

There’s a whole bunch of other stuff too, but I’ve not got through all my emails yet. Just looking at this is giving me the fear. So much for my year off conferences…

See you there!

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle OpenWorld and Code One 2019 was first posted on September 6, 2019 at 8:40 am.
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Video : Vagrant : Oracle Database Build (19c on OL8)

Mon, 2019-08-12 02:18

Today’s video is an example of using Vagrant to perform an Oracle database build.

In this example I was using Oracle 19c on Oracle Linux 8. It also installs APEX 19.1, ORDS 19.2, SQLcl 19.2, with ORDS running on Tomcat 9 and OpenJDK 12.

If you’re new to Vagrant, there is an introduction video here. There’s also an article if you prefer to read that.

If you want to play around with some of my other Vagrant builds, you can find them here.

If you want to read about some of the individual pieces that make up this build, you can find them here.

The star of today’s video is Noel Portugal. It’s been far too long since I’ve seen you dude!

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Vagrant : Oracle Database Build (19c on OL8) was first posted on August 12, 2019 at 8:18 am.
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Driving vs. Being Driven : The reason you fail to get good at anything!

Wed, 2019-07-31 01:38

It doesn’t matter how many times I’ve gone somewhere. I only know the route when I’ve driven there myself. Everything makes sense when you see someone else do it. You don’t realise how distracted you are, and how much you’ve missed until you have to do it for yourself.

When we have consultants on site to help us with something new, I assume I’m going to drive and they are going to give directions. I make notes as necessary, but the main thing is *I’ve done it*, not them. If I’m told I have to “observe and make notes”, I say I’m not willing to support it, as experience tells me there will be important stuff that gets missed as the consultant rushes through it. Once again, it’s the difference between driving and being driven.

I’ve written a lot about Learning New Things, and I think it always starts with learning to learn for yourself. If you are always relying on other people to lead the way, they are driving and you are being driven. They are getting better and you are just drifting.

I suppose the obvious retort to this is,

“Only a fool learns from his own mistakes. The wise man learns from the mistakes of others.”

Otto von Bismark

There is some truth in that, but the import thing in the second sentence is the wise person *learns* from the mistakes of others. There is still something active going on here. You are learning, not just being passive and waiting to be told what to do.

Standing on the shoulders of giants requires you to climb up on to the shoulders in the first place!

Cheers

Tim…

Driving vs. Being Driven : The reason you fail to get good at anything! was first posted on July 31, 2019 at 7:38 am.
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MobaXterm & KeePass Updates

Tue, 2019-07-30 02:52

Yesterday I noticed some updates to a couple of tools I use all the time.

MobaXterm 12.0

Followers of the blog know I’ve had a long term love affair with MobaXterm. If you are using Windows and connect to servers using SSH, this is the best tool I’ve come across.

Downloads and Changelog are in the usual places.

KeePass 2.42.1

I use KeePass as my password manager.

Downloads and Changelog are in the usual places.

You can read about how I use KeePass and KeePassXC on my Windows, Mac and Android devices here.

Cheers

Tim…

MobaXterm & KeePass Updates was first posted on July 30, 2019 at 8:52 am.
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Docker : New Builds Using Oracle Linux 8 (oraclelinux:8-slim)

Tue, 2019-07-30 00:41

Yesterday I noticed the oraclelinux section on Docker Hub included “oraclelinux:8-slim”, so when I got home a did a quick run through some builds using it.

  • ol8_ords : This build is based on “oraclelinux:8-slim” and includes OpenJDK 12, Tomcat 9, ORDS 19, SQLcl 19 and the APEX 19 images.
  • ol8_19 : This build is based on “oraclelinux:8-slim” and includes the 19c database and APEX 19.
  • ol8_183 : This build is based on “oraclelinux:8-slim” and includes the 18c database and APEX 19.

There are also some new compose files, so I could test database and ORDS containers working together.

Everything worked fine, but here come the inevitable warnings and comments.

  • The Oracle database is not certified on Oracle Linux 8 yet, so the database builds are just for playing around, not a recommendation.
  • The database preinstall packages don’t exist yet, so I installed the main required packages with DNF, but I didn’t do some of the additional manual setup I would normally do, so it’s not a perfect example of an installation. I assume the preinstall packages will eventually be released, and I will substitute them in.
  • The ORDS build is not subject to the same certification restrictions as the database, so as far as I know, I could consider using this, although the build I use for work differs a little to this and is still using Oracle JDK 8 and Tomcat 8.5.

If you are interested in playing around with Docker, you can find my articles on it here, and my public builds here.

Cheers

Tim…

Docker : New Builds Using Oracle Linux 8 (oraclelinux:8-slim) was first posted on July 30, 2019 at 6:41 am.
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Video : Ranking using RANK, DENSE_RANK and ROW_NUMBER : Problem Solving using Analytic Functions

Mon, 2019-06-17 02:36

Today’s video is a run through ranking data using the RANK, DENSE_RANK and ROW_NUMBER analytic functions.

There is more information about these and other analytic functions in the following articles.

The star of today’s video is Chris Saxon, who is one of the folks keeping the masses up to speed at AskTom.

Cheers

Tim…

Video : Ranking using RANK, DENSE_RANK and ROW_NUMBER : Problem Solving using Analytic Functions was first posted on June 17, 2019 at 8:36 am.
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Dbvisit Standby 9 Installation on Linux (and Vagrant)

Tue, 2019-06-11 03:45

The folks at Dbvisit recently released version 9 of their Dbvisit standby product.

It’s been a while since I last played with the product, so I downloaded the free trial and gave it a whirl.

I have to admit I forgot just how easy it is to work with. It feels pretty much like “unzip and go”. The result of my playtime was this article.

I also knocked up a Vagrant build, so I can easily recreate it. You can find that here.

I stuck to a basic configuration of a single instance primary (node1) and standby (node2), with the console on a separate VM (console). If you want to try something more exotic, or you are using Windows, you can get more information from the Installing Dbvisit Standby documentation.

Cheers

Tim…

PS. This isn’t a sponsored post. I’ve known the folks at Dbvisit for years so I keep an eye on what they are doing.

Dbvisit Standby 9 Installation on Linux (and Vagrant) was first posted on June 11, 2019 at 9:45 am.
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Cloud : Who are the gatekeepers now?

Wed, 2019-05-29 01:17

There’s something you might consider sinister lurking in the cloud, and it might cause a big disruption in who are considered the gatekeepers of your company’s services. I’ve mentioned governance in passing before, but maybe it’s time for me to do some thinking out loud to get this straight in my own head.

In the on-prem world the IT departments tend to be the gatekeepers, because they are responsible for provisioning, developing and maintaining the systems. If you want some new infrastructure or a new application, you have to go and ask IT, so it’s pretty easy for them to keep a handle on what is going on and stay in control.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

The initial move to the cloud didn’t really change this. Most people who proudly proclaimed they had moved to the cloud were using Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and were really just using the cloud provider as a basic hosting company. I’ve never really considered this cloud. Yes, you get some flexibility in resource allocation, but it’s pretty much what we’ve always done with hosting companies. It’s just “other people’s servers”. As far as IaaS goes, the gatekeepers are still the same, because you need all/most of the same skills to plan, setup and maintain such systems.

Platform as a Service (PaaS)

When we start talking about Platform as a Service (PaaS), things start to get a little bit trickier. The early days of PaaS weren’t a great deal different to IaaS, as some of the PaaS services weren’t what I would call platforms. They were glorified IaaS, with pre-installed software you had to manage yourself. With the emergence of proper platforms, which automate much of the day-to-day drudgery, things started to shift. A developer could request a database without having to speak to the DBAs, sysadmins, virtualisation and network folks. You can of course question the logic of that, but it’s an option and there is the beginning of a power shift.

When we start talking about IoT and Serverless platforms things change big-time. The chances are the gatekeeper will be the budget holder, since you will be charged on a per request basis, and probably have to set a maximum spend per unit time to keep things under control. Depending on how your company manages departmental budgets, the gatekeeper could be whoever has some spare cash this quarter…

Software as a Service (SaaS)

Software as a Service (SaaS) possibly presents the biggest challenge for traditional on-prem IT departments, as the business can literally go out and pick the product they want, without so much of a thought for what IT think about it. Once they’ve spent the money, they will probably come to IT and expect them to magic up all the data integrations to make things work as expected. Also, once that money has been spent, good luck trying to persuade people they backed the wrong horse. SaaS puts the business users directly in the driving seat.

Conclusion

It would be naive to think any movement to the cloud (IaaS, PaaS or SaaS) could be done independently of an existing IT department, but the tide is turning.

The IT world has changed. The traditional power bases are eroding, and you’ve got to adapt to survive. Every time you say “No”, without offering an alternative solution, you’re helping to make yourself redundant. Every time you say, “We will need to investigate it”, as a delaying tactic, you’re helping to make yourself redundant. Every time you ignore new development and delivery pipelines and platforms, you are sending yourself to an early retirement. I’m not saying jump on every bandwagon, but you need to be aware of them, and why they may or may not be useful to you and your company.

Recently I heard someone utter the phrase, “you’re not the only hotel in town”. I love that, and it should be a wake-up call for any traditional IT departments and clouds deniers.

It’s natural selection baby! Adapt or die!

Cheers

Tim…

Cloud : Who are the gatekeepers now? was first posted on May 29, 2019 at 7:17 am.
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The problem with Googling for solutions

Fri, 2019-05-24 05:35

I started to write a post, then realised I’ve already written it several times before, with the most coherent of them here.

So instead I’m going to change it up a little and tell a story.

I’m a generalist, and as you will know it’s really hard to be good at everything, so clearly there are some things I’m “not so good at”. Like most people, I use Google a lot, and my Google-fu is strong.

A couple of weeks ago we did a security scan of an existing system, which revealed some security flaws. It was a non-Oracle product, so I didn’t have a recipe to follow and I started Googling for solutions. The product in question is very popular, and there were lots of responses to my Google search, with most of the top results coming from Stack Exchange (Stack Overflow). Happy days I thought, as the Stack Exchange sites is effectively peer-reviewed, in that the correct answers are usually up-voted.

I looked at the first few different threads and people were saying the same thing. The highest up-voted answer on each thread gave a very direct and simple parameter value to solve the issue I had, so I was happy…

I followed the advice, set the parameter, restarted the service and tested. It didn’t do what everyone claimed it would. Armed with the parameter name, I searched the product documentation, and clearly the parameter didn’t do what the Stack Exchange answers said it did.

That seemed very odd, so I assumed these must be answers that were correct for an old version of the product. I checked the docs for previous versions. Same result. After reading the docs I found the real answer, implemented it, tested it and it worked.

What is really worrying about this is the answers on several threads on Stack Exchange were wrong. Those incorrect answers had been up-voted by lots of people, which suggests they agreed with the answer, even though these solutions could *never* have worked. So this seems to indicate one of two things to me.

  • People read the answer, it sounded plausible, which it did, so they up-voted it without trying it.
  • People had actually used this solution, thought it was the right solution and up-voted it, but clearly never tested their system or they would have seen it didn’t work and they still have the same security flaw.

One of the things I say in that post linked above is.

“Remember, even when you have built up a list of trusted sources, you should still constantly test what they say. Everyone can make mistakes.”

That’s really important because the internet is full of great information, but it’s also full of bullshit. Being able to tell the difference is really important, and the only way to do that is to test it, or do further research if it’s something you can’t test for yourself…

Cheers

Tim…

The problem with Googling for solutions was first posted on May 24, 2019 at 11:35 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

VirtualBox 6.0.6

Wed, 2019-04-17 02:33

VirtualBox 6.0.6 was released last night.

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

So far I’ve only had a chance to install it on my Windows 10 laptop at home and my Windows 10 laptop at work. No dramas on either. I’ll probably do the installations on macOS Mojave and Oracle Linux 7 hosts tonight. I’ll add an update here to say how they’ve gone.

With all the other Oracle updates that have just come out, I’ll be doing loads of Vagrant and Docker builds over the next couple of evenings, so this should get a reasonable workout.

Cheers

Tim…

Update: The installations on macOS Mojave and Oracle Linux 7 hosts worked fine too.

VirtualBox 6.0.6 was first posted on April 17, 2019 at 8:33 am.
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The Art of Miscommunication : About that thing from last week…

Tue, 2019-04-16 03:25

One of the things I get all the time is an apparent continuation of a conversation I was in some time ago, and I’m meant to pick up the thread without any explanation or context.

Depending on the people you are dealing with, this can be quite an easy trap to fall into. As a DBA that looks after many instances of multiple database engines, middle tier technologies and load balancers, I tend to get pulled into loads of conversations. For the person in question, let’s say a developer working on one project, they see this interaction as a one-to-one relationship between them and me, but for me it’s a one-to-many, as I’m dealing with many such conversations at the same time.

When I’m in that position I’ve stopped trying to figure it out, and now the conversation goes something like this.

  • Person : You know that thing we were talking about last week?
  • Me : No.
  • Person : You know, that thing…
  • Me : I literally have no idea. Please explain…

In some situations, it turns out it wasn’t even me they had the conversation with, or I wasn’t copied into the emails. A fact that only becomes evident when they take the time to order their thoughts…

I’m generally pretty happy to help people out, but I’m not going to go through hypnotherapy to pull back distant memories in order to continue a conversation you think I should remember. As you saw from my previous post on this subject, I expect each interaction to be self-contained. If there is any context necessary, it should be in the interaction itself. I shouldn’t need the skills of Professor X to pull it out of your head…

So before you pick up the phone, start typing on chat, or begin an email, take a second to plan the conversation in your own mind.

  • What introduction is necessary to get people up to speed?
  • Is there any prior knowledge I’m assuming, that I probably shouldn’t?
  • What is the main purpose of this interaction?
  • What are the outcomes I’m looking for?

It will only take a couple of seconds to figure this out. I’m not asking you to spend an hour preparing for a five minute chat, but don’t just launch into a stream of consciousness and expect everyone else to jump back in at exactly the same spot they left.

Cheers

Tim…

The Art of Miscommunication : About that thing from last week… was first posted on April 16, 2019 at 9:25 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Video : JSON_MERGEPATCH Function in Oracle Database 19c

Mon, 2019-04-08 05:25

Today’s video is a run through the JSON_MERGEPATCH function, which was introduced in Oracle 19c.

For those that don’t do video, this was based on the following article.

The star of today’s video is Rene Antunez.

Cheers

Tim…

Video : JSON_MERGEPATCH Function in Oracle Database 19c was first posted on April 8, 2019 at 11:25 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Oracle Help Center of the Future: Reimagining Documentation (COLLABORATE 19)

Sat, 2019-04-06 03:13

If you follow me on Twitter you will know I recently had a conference call with the Oracle Documentation folks. We were discussing a number of points, some of which were related to a blog post of mine here.

Following that Roland Mcleod from the team mentioned they would be at Collaborate 19. This is an ideal opportunity for people to give their feedback directly to the team, and help shape the future of the documentation. Please go and speak to them, and give some constructive feedback about the documentation for whatever Oracle products you work with. Let them know what you like, dislike and how things would work better for you! It’s important they understand how you like to consume information, if you want the documentation to improve.

It’s also important that a variety of people get involved. Young, old, experienced and fresh to the game. We all like to consume information in a different way, and it’s important the documentation works for everybody.

I also said I would give their Collaborate 19 sessions a shout out, so here is what Roland sent me.

Can you reimagine Oracle Documentation and Help?

The Oracle Help Center is undergoing a complete redesign. We need all customers, partners and consultants to help us make it work for you.

Please attend one of our sessions and come by to see us at the Oracle Exhibit Area: Oracle Help Center Ambassadors!

Session ID: 112040
Oracle Help Center of the Future: Reimagining Documentation
10:30 AM–11:30 AM Apr 8, 2019
CC 2ND FL 225B

Oracle Help Center of the Future: Reimagining Documentation
3:15 PM–4:15 PM Apr 8, 2019
CC 2ND FL 225B

Session Abstract: In this interactive session; you’ll have an opportunity to provide your feedback about the current and future Oracle Help Center (docs.oracle.com). You will be invited to share how you use documentation in your role and at your organization. This session includes a brief preview of the future Oracle Help Center experience.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Help Center of the Future: Reimagining Documentation (COLLABORATE 19) was first posted on April 6, 2019 at 9:13 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

OUG Ireland 2019 : It’s a wrap for me!

Fri, 2019-04-05 03:10

This is going to be a really short post, because the event was really short for me.

It was an early start, which meant a lack of sleep. As usual, this made me feel terrible. I never sleep well, so when something interferes with my already terrible routine I really can’t handle these days. The flight across was fine, and I got to the hotel at the correct time. Unfortunately, I had made a reservation for the wrong month. They had free rooms, so I paid for a room for about twice the price of the original room I booked. I got a shower and sat down to think. I then booked a new flight home for that evening.

I had a couple of DMs from concerned folks who had seen my tweets. Debra came across to chat to me, as she was flying out after lunch, and I had decided I was only turning up for my own session.

My session was a “Multitenant : What’s new in Oracle Database 18c & 12c Release 2” at 15:10. I did the session and went back to my room to wait for my flight home. When the time came, I flew home. Everything was fine.

I’m sure the conference was great, because it always is. Sorry for not being present for most of it.

Cheers

Tim…

OUG Ireland 2019 : It’s a wrap for me! was first posted on April 5, 2019 at 9:10 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Video : SQL/JSON : Generate JSON from SQL

Mon, 2019-03-04 01:38

Today’s video is a quick run through some of the SQL/JSON functionality introduced in Oracle database 12.2.

For those people that want a lot more information, including copy/paste examples, check out the article it’s based upon, and all the other JSON stuff I’ve written here.

The star of today’s video is Roel Hartman of APEX fame!

Cheers

Tim…

Video : SQL/JSON : Generate JSON from SQL was first posted on March 4, 2019 at 8:38 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

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