Tim Hall

Subscribe to Tim Hall feed
Oracle related rants (and lots of off-topic stuff)...
Updated: 4 months 3 weeks ago

OUG Ireland 2019 : It’s a wrap for me!

Fri, 2019-04-05 03:10

This is going to be a really short post, because the event was really short for me.

It was an early start, which meant a lack of sleep. As usual, this made me feel terrible. I never sleep well, so when something interferes with my already terrible routine I really can’t handle these days. The flight across was fine, and I got to the hotel at the correct time. Unfortunately, I had made a reservation for the wrong month. They had free rooms, so I paid for a room for about twice the price of the original room I booked. I got a shower and sat down to think. I then booked a new flight home for that evening.

I had a couple of DMs from concerned folks who had seen my tweets. Debra came across to chat to me, as she was flying out after lunch, and I had decided I was only turning up for my own session.

My session was a “Multitenant : What’s new in Oracle Database 18c & 12c Release 2” at 15:10. I did the session and went back to my room to wait for my flight home. When the time came, I flew home. Everything was fine.

I’m sure the conference was great, because it always is. Sorry for not being present for most of it.

Cheers

Tim…

OUG Ireland 2019 : It’s a wrap for me! was first posted on April 5, 2019 at 9:10 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Video : SQL/JSON : Generate JSON from SQL

Mon, 2019-03-04 01:38

Today’s video is a quick run through some of the SQL/JSON functionality introduced in Oracle database 12.2.

For those people that want a lot more information, including copy/paste examples, check out the article it’s based upon, and all the other JSON stuff I’ve written here.

The star of today’s video is Roel Hartman of APEX fame!

Cheers

Tim…

Video : SQL/JSON : Generate JSON from SQL was first posted on March 4, 2019 at 8:38 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

OBUG Tech Days Belgium 2019

Tue, 2019-02-05 02:40

The BOUG Tech Days 2019 conference is happening on the 7th-8th February, which is Thursday and Friday this week. I see from the Twitter-verse that some people are already there and checking out the city.

I’ll be flying out on Thursday morning, and flying back Friday night, so it’s an overnight stay for me.

The list of speakers is pretty impressive, so it looks like it’s going to be a good one.

See you there!

Cheers

Tim…

OBUG Tech Days Belgium 2019 was first posted on February 5, 2019 at 9:40 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

VirtualBox 6.0.4

Tue, 2019-01-29 05:40

VirtualBox 6.0.4 has been released. Hot on the heels of version 6.0.2, we got this new release last night (UK time).

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

I’ve installed it on my Windows 10 laptop at work. I’ll do my personal Windows 10 laptop, old MBP and OL7 server when I get home, and post an update here to say how I got on.

Cheers

Tim…

Update: Everything went fine with the installation on my Windows 10 laptop, MBP running macOS Mojave and server running Oracle Linux 7.

VirtualBox 6.0.4 was first posted on January 29, 2019 at 12:40 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Video : JSON Data Guide

Mon, 2019-01-28 04:17

Today’s video is an overview of the JSON Data Guide functionality introduced in Oracle 12.2.

If videos aren’t your thing, you can read the articles instead. This video focuses on the main features that were introduced in 12.2, but there are some nice additions in 18c also.

The cameo in today’s video is Toon Koppelaars of #SMartDB fame.

Cheers

Tim…

PS. Subscribe to my YouTube channel here.

Video : JSON Data Guide was first posted on January 28, 2019 at 11:17 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Oracle 19c Released : How does that make you feel?

Sat, 2019-01-19 08:04

Back in 2017 I wrote a post about the move to the yearly release cycle for Oracle software. It’s over 18 months since that post and we’ve had 18c and now 19c released (on LiveSQL), so I thought I would reflect on some of the pros and cons I mentioned in that original post. If you want to know what I originally said about these points, go back to the original post.

Pros
  • Quicker release of features : It’s becoming clear to me that some of the 18c features were actually 12cR2 features that didn’t make it into the documentation, even though they were present in the product. I’m not sure if these were present in the initial release of 12.2.0.1, or got introduced in the proactive bundle patches later. I have no problem with this, but it feels like the documentation is not keeping up with the new features added in the release updates. Where 18c is concerned we’ve had 18.1, 18.2, 18.3, 18.4 and now 18.5, but I don’t see a change in the documentation. Now a drop of the documentation once a year that includes the latest changes is better than the once every 4 years, but it still feels odd that we’re getting new functionality added, but no way to see that except for scouring MOS notes. I wonder if this situation will continue in 19c release.
  • Predictable release cycles : Yes. Nice.
  • Stability : This was originally one of my cons, but I’m going to move it to the pros section. I was worried the quicker release cycle might lead to a lack of stability, rather than the improved stability. I don’t know how other people feel, but 12.2 and 18c have been pretty good for me. I try and apply the proactive bundle patches (BP), now Release Updates (RUs), so I’m going all-in and things have been good. We are a “middle of the bell curve” company, so I probably won’t experience some of the edge cases you might, but that’s what I feel about it. I hope 19c continues this trend, as I see it.
Cons
  • Upgrade/Patch burnout : I’m currently upgrading some databases to 18c, but part of me is thinking, “What’s the point?” Let’s say the on-prem 19c drops in April, and we will wait for the first RU after that which might be July. I’m potentially only 6 months from having a viable 19c upgrade path, which is after all the Long Term Support (LTS) release. Should I bother with 18c now? I can understand if some people say no. I’m still going to move forward, as this solves some other issues for me, including the conversion to Multitenant of some 11.2 instances, which will make future upgrades easier. Having said that, mentally it is a downer and I can feel an element of this burnout I predicted.
  • Product Support/Certification : Yep. As predicted, many companies don’t seem to recognise that 18c even exists, let alone support their products on it. If I were charitable I would say they are waiting for 19c as it’s a LTS release, but in reality they are still struggling to check that 12.2 PDBs work for their products. I hope vendors get their act together to provide support for these new versions more quickly. That includes Oracle too.
Unsure
  • Learning : This still concerns me. I got access to 18c straight away on Oracle Cloud and LiveSQL, so really I’ve had nearly a year of 18c. For those people that first experienced it after the on-prem release, they’ve had about 6 months experience and the 19c hype train has started. Now it will still be a year from one on-prem release to the next, but it just kind-of feels like it’s only a 6 month release, if you know what I mean. I’m currently still writing about 18c features, but part of me is thinking, “What’s the point?” My mind is looking forward to 19c. As we move forward I realise each release will be smaller, so working through the new features will not be so heavy, but I’m still worried people (and I really mean me) will disconnect.
  • Certification : I just checked today and they are still pushing the 12cR2 certification. Now this is still relevant, as 18c and 19c are effectively 12.2.0.2 and 12.2.0.3 respectively, but it just sounds bad. Hey, 19c has just been released and I’m working for the 12cR2 certification? I get the distinct feeling certification is dead to me now. Let’s see what Oracle Education do with this. Maybe I’ll change my mind.

Of course, it’s still early days so we will see how the cookie crumbles over the coming releases. I suspect I may be forced to cherry-pick a little.

Cheers

Tim…

PS. A Twitter comment from Frits Hoogland made me feel I should add something. If you are happy with what you have and don’t feel the need to upgrade often, that’s cool. Constantly chasing an upgrade can be problematic because of the instabilities it can cause. The new release cycle is allegedly meant to reduce that by drip-feeding change in smaller, manageable chunks…

Although a DBA may like some of the new features, they affect comparatively few people in the company. I feel development new features are a bigger draw for getting people to buy into the upgrade cycle. Just this week a project started on an existing 11.2 instance, but involved a bunch of JSON functionality, so it was moved across to an 18c instance. The developers only know this functionality is in 12.2 and 18c because I’ve actively promoted it. If I had not done this, they would have stuck with 11.2 and wasted a bunch of time manually coding stuff.

I’m a fan of keeping up with the latest versions, both personally and in the companies I work. In my experience avoiding upgrades and patches tends to cause more problems than keeping relatively up to date. Just my opinion though…

Oracle 19c Released : How does that make you feel? was first posted on January 19, 2019 at 3:04 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

VirtualBox 6.0.2

Wed, 2019-01-16 08:22

VirtualBox 6.0.2 has been released.

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

I’ve installed it on my Windows 10 laptop at work, which I use with Vagrant for testing of Oracle, WebLogic, Tomcat server builds, as well as Docker builds. I’ll do my personal Windows 10 laptop, old MBP and OL7 server when I get home.

Update: I’ve done an install on my Windows 10 laptop, MackBook Pro running macOS Mojave and a server running Oracle Linux 7. The installations of VirtualBox 6.0.2 on all hosts worked fine. I rebuilt a bunch of VMs using Vagrant 2.2.3 and everything looks good.

Cheers

Tim…

VirtualBox 6.0.2 was first posted on January 16, 2019 at 3:22 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

KeePass 2.41

Wed, 2019-01-16 02:31

I just noticed KeePass 2.41 was released about a week ago.

Downloads and Changelog available from the usual places.

You can read about how I use KeePass and KeePassXC on my Windows, Mac and Android devices here.

Cheers

Tim…

KeePass 2.41 was first posted on January 16, 2019 at 9:31 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

2018 : A Year in Review

Mon, 2018-12-31 10:53

What a strange year this has been for me from a technology perspective!

The Good

Lots of good things have happened over the year.

  • I did presentations at 15 separate tech events, as well as a talk to students at a local university. I do some talks at work too, but you can’t really count that. Even though I had some drama at some of the conferences, the presentations went well for the most part.
  • I was one of a group of people named as an “Oracle Code One Star” at Oracle Code One 2018, based on the speaker evaluations from last year’s Java One conference.
  • I got a Lifetime Achievement Award at UKOUG Tech18. This sounds a bit like being put out to pasture, but it’s just another speaker award based on the speaker evaluations from UKOUG Tech 17. You can only win three awards, so your third is called a lifetime achievement award, and you aren’t allowed in the race in following years.
  • I wrote over 150 blog posts, which averages at about one every 2.5 days. That sounds like a lot, considering I feel like I’ve not had much time to write this year.
  • I wrote over 90 articles for the website, which is more than one every 4 days. That also sounds like a lot. I just checked and in the last 18.5 years I’ve averaged more than one article a week. Crazy.
  • I’ve been putting a bunch of stuff on GitHub. It’s all stuff I’m messing with, as opposed to “real projects”, but it feels nice.
The Bad and the Ugly

Followers of the blog know this has been a tough year for me, because I keep moaning about it in posts like this.

When I’m travelling I pretty much write a daily diary on the blog, which reads like, “Which country did Tim puke in today?” I can’t have another year like this year.

Work has been hard this year, and will continue to be for the foreseeable future. I feel like I’m trapped in an abusive relationship with work. There are some big projects happening over the coming year and cruising is not an option. I’m not really sure how I’m going to cope. Time will tell I guess.

Next Year

Not resolutions as such, but some things I am thinking about for next year.

  • I’ve got to sort out my crappy lifestyle a bit. I’ve let everything just go to wrack and ruin this year and it shows both mentally and physically. I’m convinced it’s a big factor in the way this year has gone. I’m not going to make any rash promises, because I know me, but if I can just tune in again things might get better.
  • I’ve turned down a few conferences already for 2019. I will still be doing some, but I’m not sure how many. My confidence has hit rock-bottom and I just need something to dig me out of this funk. I tried to muscle through it this year, and it’s caused more harm than good.
  • It would be nice to do some YouTube videos again. I keep meaning to, but similar to the conference presentations, I’ve lost my mojo. I have no goals as far as numbers are concerned, but it would be nice to think this time next year I can say I’ve done some. At the moment, I’m enjoying putting together Fortnite game play videos for nephew #2 and nephew #1 has started to use my GoPro to record his downhill mountain biking, so I’ve done the first of what might be many of those for him.
  • As far as the website goes, it’s more of the same. Having some time over Christmas has allowed me to do some more learning and writing and I just feel more positive about things. It feels like getting back to my roots.
  • Work? It’s the classic case of you can work hard, or you can work long, but you can’t do both. Like a number of other people the days are getting longer and longer, but the backlog is not getting any shorter. I’ve just got to push the keyboard away and leave. It will all be there in the morning and I’ll be in a better position to deal with it.

Happy New Year everyone!

Cheers

Tim…

2018 : A Year in Review was first posted on December 31, 2018 at 5:53 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Visibility vs Results

Sat, 2018-12-22 03:23

If you speak to my colleagues you will know one of my regular topics of conversation at meetings is the “judgement of worth” within the company. I get quite annoyed when I see people who I believe are adding value, but always seem to get ignored, while others who talk a great talk, but ultimately can’t walk the walk, seem to catch all the breaks. It seems visibility is more important than getting results these days.

One of my colleagues sent me a link to this article and it really sums up what I keep saying.

I’ve spent the last 18 years telling the internet what I think, so I couldn’t deny a tendency for self-promotion, but I like to think I can actually deliver, not just talk about it! Of course, you will never really know unless you work with me, and that’s the point. It certainly seems people believe what they are told, regardless of whether there is any factual basis to it.

So what should you do? Well in my opinion, maybe this is a start.

  1. Actually learn your subject in the first place. I hope your aim isn’t to be one of these creeps. I hope your aim is to continuously improve and deserve any good breaks you get.
  2. Learn to speak about your subject in a clear, concise and professional manner. Don’t sit there silently, then blame the world for being unfair. The world is unfair! Deal with it! Make a positive change! If you need some pointers, I’ve written some public speaking tips here.
  3. Learn to write in a clear, concise and professional manner. If you write unintelligible emails, people are going to assume you are dumb. I happen to think blogging is a good way to improve your writing skills. I’ve written some pointers about blogging here. Ultimately, it doesn’t matter how you get there, but you must be able to make yourself understood.
  4. Don’t let other people take the credit for what you do. I’m not suggesting you write an email to the CEO every time you deploy an application, but by the same token, don’t let someone else stand up and take the credit you deserve, especially if it’s because you are too scared to actually stand up and speak for yourself, and instead rely on others to present your work.
  5. For the bosses out there, try to start judging people by actual results, rather than by what they say they can/have done.

I realise I sound kind-of narky in this post, but I think it’s really important. It really gets on my nerves when I see people taking the credit for other people’s work, and I’m equally annoyed when I see other people letting it happen.

I’m not suggesting you bully the perpetrators, or make a big show of the situation. Just don’t give them the opportunity to steal your moment in the sun!

Good luck folks!

Cheers

Tim…

PS. The wife said something in a Facebook comment that reminded me of something I wanted to say. I regularly get accused of name dropping, because I say things like, “I was chatting with X, and they said…”. This isn’t me trying to brag about all the “famous” people I know. It’s because I don’t want to come over as having these ideas for myself. I’m going to name-check people, even if you think it makes me look like I’m bragging, because they deserve the credit for their work and their ideas. If they tell me the origin of their idea, I’ll say, “I spoke to X, who said they heard Y say…”. Sorry if this annoys you personally, or you want to make a negative judgement about why I do it, but I think it matters…

Visibility vs Results was first posted on December 22, 2018 at 10:23 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Why Automation Matters : The Series

Sat, 2018-11-24 04:20

A few months ago I decided to write a post about the lost time associated with the hand-offs between teams. It was relevant to a conversation I wanted to have, and I wanted to order my thoughts before I went into that conversation. That post accidentally became a series of posts, which I’ve listed below.

I’m not an expert at automation and I’m far from being an expert at DevOps. Theses were just a useful exercise for me, so I thought they might be of interest to other people.

I’m not sure if I’ll write any more, but if I do, I’ll add them to this page.

I’ve added an Automation category to the blog, which I’ve been using to categorise these posts, and other things like my posts about Docker and Vagrant.

Cheers

Tim…

Why Automation Matters : The Series was first posted on November 24, 2018 at 11:20 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Why Automation Matters : Technical Debt

Fri, 2018-11-23 05:11

I was going to include Technical Debt in yesterday’s post about Unplanned Work, but I thought it deserved a post of its own.

What is it? You can read a definition here, but essentially it comes down to a short-termism approach to solving problems. It can be applied to many situations, but here are two.

  • You have a bunch of applications written in Oracle Forms 6i. A new requirement comes in, and rather than biting the bullet and writing the new application in something more up to date, you write it in Forms 6i and ship it.
  • You have to build a new server, which involves manual processes for building the VM, OS and other software (app server, DB etc.). You go ahead and do it the way you always have, rather than using this as an opportunity to take a step back and start working on automation first.

In both these cases, it might actually be the correct decision to just move forward, as you may not have the necessary time and skills yet to do something “better”. It’s not the specific decision that matters as much as the recognition of the implications of that decision. By moving forward with this, you have to recognise you’ve added to your technical debt.

In the case of the development example it’s quite obvious. You now have yet another application that will have to be upgraded/rewritten in the future. You’ve added to your future workload.

In the case of the server it may be less obvious. If everything were done properly, with no human errors, you may have a beautifully consistent and perfect server, but the reality is that isn’t going to happen and you’ve just added another “non-standard” server to your organisation, that will probably result in more unplanned work later, and should immediately go on the list of things that needs replacing, once an automated and standardised approach is created.

Technical debt is insidious because it’s so easy to justify that you made the right decision, and turn a blind eye to the problems down the road.

What’s this got to do with automation? In this case it’s about removing obstacles. Improving your delivery of infrastructure and application delivery pipeline makes it far easier to make changes in the future, and one thing we know about working in technology is everything is constantly changing. I see automation as an enabler of change, which can help you make decisions that won’t add to your technical debt.

Cheers

Tim…

Why Automation Matters : Technical Debt was first posted on November 23, 2018 at 12:11 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Bulgarian Oracle User Group (BGOUG) 2018 : The Journey Home

Mon, 2018-11-19 00:12

It was a 03:00 start, which is never a good thing. I got down to reception to meet my fellow travellers and we started on our trip to the airport. As we walked out of the hotel we were greeted by a lite scattering of snow. It was clearly visible on some of the mountains the day before, but it was quite a surprise to see it here, especially as I left my balcony door open for the whole of my stay…

The drive to the airport was quick, as there was very little traffic. The baggage drop and check-in queue for Lufthansa was pretty large, but fortunately I had checked in online and I was hang-luggage only, so I walked straight to, and through, security. That left me with over an hour before the flight.

The flight from Sofia to Frankfurt was pretty easy. I had an empty seat next to me, so I got the laptop out and started to write two presentations I’ve got to give at work.

I was expecting the layover in Frankfurt to be about 70 minutes, but it turned out is was nearly 5 hours, because I didn’t read the itinerary properly, so I logged into work and cleared down all the crap that collected during the two days I was away.

The flight from Frankfurt to Birmingham was about and hour and went pretty smoothly. Once again I had an empty seat next to me, so happy days!

Getting through security was pretty quick, then I was in the bounciest taxi ride ever to get home, and that is was my last international conference of the year complete.

As followers of the blog will know, this year has been problematic for me from a conference perspective. It’s especially disappointing when my travelling curse hits my favourite conference of the year.

Thanks to everyone from BGOUG for letting me come for the 8th time. Thanks to the people who came to my sessions. The turnout was great, and it certainly lifted my spirits! Sorry I wasn’t able to get more involved on the first day, but at least everything went well on the second day. See you again soon!

Cheers

Tim…

PS. Here are the other posts from this trip.

 

Bulgarian Oracle User Group (BGOUG) 2018 : The Journey Home was first posted on November 19, 2018 at 7:12 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Birmingham City University (BCU) Talk #7

Tue, 2018-11-06 02:53

Yesterday I went to Birmingham City University (BCU) to do a talk on “Graduate Employability” to a bunch of second year undergraduate IT students. I’ve done this a few times at BCU, and also at UKOUG for a session directed at students.

The session is what originally inspired the my series of blog posts called What Employers Want.

I’ve mentioned before, these sessions are a little different to your typical conference sessions. Perhaps you should try reaching out to a local college or university to see if they need some guest speakers, and try something outside your comfort zone.

Thanks to Jagdev Bhogal and BCU for inviting me again. See you again soon.

Cheers

Tim…

Birmingham City University (BCU) Talk #7 was first posted on November 6, 2018 at 9:53 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

MobaXTerm 11.0

Fri, 2018-11-02 12:27

Looks like MobaXTerm 11.0 was released yesterday

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

This version comes with a log list of bug fixes and improvements in the changelog.

Cheers

Tim…

MobaXTerm 11.0 was first posted on November 2, 2018 at 6:27 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 3 (13.3.0.0) Upgrade

Tue, 2018-10-30 02:58

A few months ago I wrote about the installation and upgrade Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 3 (13.3.0.0).

At the time I did a clean install and an example upgrade from 13.2 to 13.3. The idea behind the upgrade was basically to practice what I needed to do at work.

Just before I left for OpenWorld I got our virtualization folks to give me a clone of the production Cloud Control VM and I ran a practice upgrade on that. It’s important to do a “real” run through, as sometimes you hit issues you don’t see when upgrading from a clean installation of the previous version. In the past the upgrade of the clean installation of the previous version has worked fine, but the real upgrade failed the prerequisite checks as some of the agents or plugins were too old. The latest test on the clone worked fine, so we had the green light to do the production upgrade.

Post OOW18, my first job on returning to work was to get Cloud Control upgraded. I repeated the process I had done on the clone and it went fine.

In a funny coincidence, while I was doing the upgrade someone retweeted the blog post from a few months ago. Weird.

As a reminder, here are the 13.3 articles.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 3 (13.3.0.0) Upgrade was first posted on October 30, 2018 at 8:58 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

VirtualBox and Vagrant : New RAC Stuff and Changes

Mon, 2018-10-01 07:41

There were a lot of changes in my Vagrant repository on GitHub last week and over the weekend.

First, I got asked a question about 12.2 RAC and I couldn’t be bothered to run through a manual build, so I took my 18c RAC hands-off build and amended it to create a 12.2 RAC hands-off build. Along the way I noticed a couple of hard-coded bits in the 18c build I hadn’t noticed previously, which I altered of course. I also had to move the 18c build to a version-specific sub-directory. I think I’ve altered all references to the location.

I went through some of my individual server builds and updated them to use the latest versions of Tomcat 9, Java 11 and APEX 18.2. All that was pretty straight forward.

On Sunday I was running some tests of the builds on my laptop while I was at my brother’s house, and I noticed I was not pulling packages from the yum repositories properly. I ended up adding “nameserver 8.8.8.8” to pretty much all the “/etc/resolv.conf” files inside the VMs. I’m not sure what has changed as that hasn’t happened before, so I’m not sure if it’s something to do with the networking… Anyway, it fixed everything, so happy days.

While I was doing these builds I learned something new. I forgot to amend the path to my ASM disks from a UNIX style path “/u05/VirtualBox/shared/ol7_183_rac/…” to a Windows style path. Vagrant didn’t care and just created the location under the C drive as “C:\u05\VirtualBox\shared\ol7_183_rac\”. I’ll have to add a note about that to my “README.md” files about that.

I’ve still got to update some Docker builds with the latest software. I’ll probably do that over this week…

Cheers

Tim…

 

VirtualBox and Vagrant : New RAC Stuff and Changes was first posted on October 1, 2018 at 1:41 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

The Future of Single-Discipline User Group Conferences

Tue, 2018-09-18 02:46

It’s just my opinion, but I think the days of the single discipline user group conference are numbered…

The big company flagship conferences will still happen, as they are more about hype and marketing, but I’m not sure what the future holds for regular user groups that want to stay with a single focus.

I don’t know many people who work on a single technology anymore. I certainly don’t know many people who would be allowed to go to a separate conference per technology they work on. That means they need to pick a subset of events, or not get involved. Either way they are being sold short.

I’m starting to think multi-discipline events like Riga Dev Days make a lot more sense. Even Oracle have gone this route with the Oracle Code events, which are multi-discipline, with an Oracle spin of course. These types of events are not without their issues too, as there has to be a limit on the content for each discipline and there can be scheduling clashes, but I think it makes it a lot easier for people to cover their bases with less conference visits per year.

There are some really strong user groups out there, but for those that are struggling, I wonder if widening the net would help? This could affect the enthusiasm of some sponsors, but it may open new opportunities too.

What do you think?

Cheers

Tim…

Update: As per comments and twitter discussion, people have cited successful “single-discipline” conferences. There will always be winners and losers, and I think many of these probably do have quite a diverse range of material, with a common thread running through them. This is how I think of Oracle Code, a diverse collection of subjects loosely woven together by an Oracle thread.

If someone has hit upon a winning formula that is still specialist, I’m not suggesting they change what is currently working for them. For those that are struggling, maybe now is the time for something different?

The Future of Single-Discipline User Group Conferences was first posted on September 18, 2018 at 8:46 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Living the Dream

Fri, 2018-09-14 02:13

I was watching a rerun of X Factor at my brother’s house at the weekend. Most of the time I was wincing at all the bum notes sung by the people the judges were saying were fantastic, or wincing at everyone who was doing it for their { mom | dad | grandma | grandad | dead parrot } in an attempt to get me emotionally invested. Apart from all that cringe, the other thing I noticed was people saying things like,

“This is my dream!”

This really gets on my nerves because invariably they’ve done nothing to make their dream become a reality, other than turn up to audition on the day. They haven’t put in the hours practising their craft. They’ve not gone out looking for constructive criticism, then using that to improve. They’ve not tried to get some training to perfect their skills. They’ve just turned up thinking that singing a bunch of off key runs will make everyone think they are Mariah.

Getting good at anything takes time and effort. If you enjoy it, you might not notice how much effort you’ve put in, but that doesn’t negate the effort you’ve put in. We always hear people speaking about natural talent, but invariably you see those “winners” put in the effort, as well as having natural gifts.

I remember hearing someone saying you should praise effort, not results. From my experience, life is a grind and the people who succeed are the people that are prepared to work hard. Natural talent doesn’t go that far in life.

Next time you hear someone talk about “their dream”, ask them what they’ve done to make it a reality. If they’ve done nothing, I suggest you tell them they are full of shit and need to get off their lazy ass and make it a reality!

Cheers

Tim…

Living the Dream was first posted on September 14, 2018 at 8:13 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

KeePass 2.40

Wed, 2018-09-12 03:06

I just noticed KeePass 2.40 was released a couple of days ago.

Downloads and Changelog available from the usual places.

You can read about how I use KeePass and KeePassXC on my Mac, Windows and Android devices here.

Cheers

Tim…

KeePass 2.40 was first posted on September 12, 2018 at 9:06 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Pages